Montana Public Media

Your resource for Montana political news

Montana Public Media is a collaboration between MontanaPBS, Montana Public Radio,
Yellowstone Public Radio, and The University of Montana School of Journalism
Montana receives “F” for its campaign finance disclosure laws

A report released this week by the National Institute on Money in State Politics gives Montana a failing grade on its disclosure laws related to campaign... 

Governor to kick off economic development initiative with roundtable discussions

Gov. Bullock announced a new economic development initiative aimed at developing a blueprint for job creation based upon the suggestions of Montana businesses.

“Guns in the Big Sky” examines Montana gun culture

The University of Montana School of Journalism, Montana Public Radio and MontanaPBS team up for three consecutive nights of gun related programs.

Gov. Bullock explains his veto strategy

Bullock says his veto strategy has been clear from the start of the Session.

Bullock vetoes draw GOP criticism

A legislative session that began with promises of compromise ended with a whole bunch of vetoes from Gov. Bullock — and plenty of criticism from Republicans.

Bullock signs pension fixes, school funding bill

Bullock took action on a slew of bills, including approving plans to overhaul the state’s pension and school funding systems.

Gov. Bullock vetoes bill allowing guns on campus

Gov. Bullock vetoed a bill that would have allowed college students to keep guns on campus, a key veto among many rejections on day of heavy action.

Flathead Legislators on the good, the bad, and the OK of the latest session

Flathead Legislators met with business leaders in Kalispell Thursday to give a wrap up of key changes from the latest legislative session.

Congressman Daines on guns, conservation and his political future

Rep. Steve Daines sat down with MTPR News Director Sally Mauk to talk about guns, conservation and his political future.

Governor signs budget bill after line-item vetos

Bullock said that he needed to reduce spending. The reductions cut about $30 million, roughly 0.4 percent of the $8 billion budget.